Nov. 30, 2020

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Governor hints some regions where spread is fiercest may face dreaded stay-at-home orders

Investigations continue into the cause of the fire, which burned for almost five days and smothered south San Diego County in noxious smoke

More than 50 participants will virtually graduate from nonprofit’s programs for women entrepreneurs and formerly incarcerated young adults

San Diego’s code compliance officials are expected to issue a notice in the next week or two that will set a 60-day deadline for the La Jolla property owners to submit proposals

The U.S. Transportation Department’s new policy, announced during the Thanksgiving holiday weekend, narrows what ‘unfair and deceptive practices’ means

Companies claim the city didn’t follow its own rules and unfairly rejected their applications.

Have questions about how county’s case rate works? Confused about rules that determine whether we advance or fall? We’ve got answers

You’re not alone. More than 900 San Diego County residents have died of the disease. We want to help you tell their stories.

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Tuesday, Dec. 1

11:00 a.m. | Conversation on Black Homeownership
Register for free at the link above to listen to and take part in this live discussion regarding racial disparities in Black homeownership.

1:30 p.m. | San Diego News Fix
Host Daniel Wheaton talks with Union-Tribune reporters about the biggest stories of the day. San Diego News Fix is also available wherever you get your podcasts.

A diversity of views and perspectives

The Community Voices Project is a forum for respectful discourse about news of the day and matters of the community that brings dozens of thought leaders together in a public dialogue, which can be a model for others.

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A full moon rises behind the San Diego-Coronado Bridge on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020 in San Diego, CA.

Images from Union-Tribune staff and contributing freelance photographers

U-T journalist Annie Heilbrunn spent the day at a super poll location in La Mesa, talking to voters about the importance of this year’s election.

San Diego State faces Rams team that has had half its game canceled and hasn’t played in three weeks

Veterans Village of San Diego, along with many partner organizations, hosted a scaled-back, socially-distant version of its annual ‘Stand Down’ event Sunday morning.

Former Hollywood actor Scott Eberlein joined the Army after 9/11 and now works to keep civilians out of harm’s way in combat.

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How open source ad blockers could save you 2 hours a week

The results of open source ad blockers show they are effective at removing ads.

Some of the results of a new study on open source ad blockers. Some ad blockers block the add and leave white space, but uBlock Origin cuts all ads and makes more content viewable on the screen.

A new study shows open source ad blockers would save the average Internet user more than 100 hours a year while also saving energy and pollution.

Although free and open source ad blockers save energy and are good for the environment, people use them primarily to block annoying ads and save themselves time.”— Professor Joshua PearceHOUGHTON, MI, US, March 31, 2020 /EINPresswire.com/ -- A new study meant to investigate energy conservation of free and open source ad blockers has unexpectedly shown that Internet ads are wasting shocking amounts of your time.

More importantly, the results show how you can get that time back. The study estimates that the average Internet user would save over 100 hours a year by using uBlock Origin, a free and open source ad blocker. “uBlock Origin was the most effective ad blocker tested, but all ad blockers save time, energy and money”, explained Joshua Pearce, a Professor of Engineering at Michigan Technological University.

The results show that page load time dropped 11% with AdBlock+, 22% with Privacy Badger, and 28% with uBlock Origin. These are not significant on a single page, but Internet users spend more than half of their time online rapidly clicking through websites spending less than 15 seconds on a given page. “With all these clicks, the additional time to load ads really starts to add up,” says Pearce.

The article “Energy Conservation with Open Source Ad Blockers” published in the journal Technologies was originally conceived to address rising energy consumption. Internet-related electricity consumption is rising rapidly as global Internet users spend more than 6.5 hours per day online. Americans, for example, have more than doubled the time they spend online since 2000 to almost 24 hours a week. Open source ad blockers have the potential to reduce the time and thus electricity spent by eliminating ads during Internet browsing and video streaming.

In the study, three open source ad blockers were tested against a no-ad blocker control. Page load times were recorded for browsing a representative selection of the globally most-accessed websites including web searching (like Google, Yahoo and Bing), information (like weather.com) and news sites (like CNN, Fox and the New York Times). In addition, the study analyzed the time spent watching ads on videos for both trending and non-trending content. This part of the study was more challenging because of the lack of data on what ratio of YouTube watching time is spent on trending and non-trending content. The time wasted viewing ads per video ranged from 0.06% up to staggering 21%. Thus, total hours lost to loading ads was only recorded for browsing.

“Overall, the results showed that the energy wasted loading ads is not trivial,” summarized Pearce. As a lot of the electricity used for running computers continues to come from coal, which causes air pollution and premature death, the study analyzed the potential for ad blockers to save American lives. The results were shocking: the energy conserved if everyone in the United States used the open source ad blocker would save over 36 Americans lives per year.

Electricity costs money, so cutting ads could also save consumers money. Pearce said, “In the United States, if all Internet users enabled Privacy Badger on their computers, Americans would save more than $91 million annually.” Globally, the results of the investigation were even more striking. uBlock Origin could save global consumers more than $1.8 billion/year.

Pearce points out, “This study was done before everyone was forced to stay home because of the COVID-19 pandemic, so all the values can be viewed as conservative under estimates.” Overall, the study found open source ad blockers are a potentially effective technology for energy conservation.

“Although free and open source ad blockers save energy and are good for the environment, people use them primarily to block annoying ads and save themselves time,” concludes Pearce.

Joshua Pearce
Michigan Tech Open Sustainability Technology Lab
+1 906-487-1466
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