Oct. 30, 2020

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Jeff Jarvis, 48, shed tears as he thanked the police officers who rescued him from the San Diego Bay the afternoon of Oct. 12

Navy Building One replaces 1920s-era waterfront warehouses along Harbor Drive, and wraps up the first phase of an experimental public-private partnership that dates to 1980

Local nonprofits experienced shrinking revenue and difficulties executing programs this year.

The County Office of Education estimated 100,000 local students were without access to the internet at start of the year

Fauci says that, as the coronavirus surges in the U.S., we may have to put off longed-for activities for another year or more.

The airline industry is promoting new studies that suggest the risk of contracting COVID-19 while flying is low. Let’s take a closer look at the assertions.

Have questions about how county’s case rate works? Confused about rules that determine whether we advance or fall? We’ve got answers

You’re not alone. More than 800 San Diego County residents have died of the disease. We want to help you tell their stories.

When Joe Biden was last in Iowa, his campaign was on the verge of collapse and he was soundly trounced in the caucuses

The poll, released Tuesday, shows a reversal of fate for Campa-Najjar who went from polling neck-and-neck with Issa to now trailing by 11 percentage points

Javier Alvarado and Matthew Leyba-Gonzalez work for LiUNA and were criticized for receiving tens of thousands of dollars from it for their campaigns.

While polls indicate a majority of Latinos support Proposition 16, the ballot measure’s confusing wording could cost it support

Voters across the region will be called on to make important decisions during the 2020 election. Our up-to-date election page makes it easy to find information on the issues and races that matter most to you and your community.

San Diego | North | East | South

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Friday, Oct. 30

1:30 p.m. | San Diego News Fix
Union-Tribune reporters discuss the biggest stories of the day in our region. San Diego News Fix is also available wherever you get your podcasts.

PHENOMENAL WOMEN

A diversity of views and perspectives

The Community Voices Project is a forum for respectful discourse about news of the day and matters of the community that brings dozens of thought leaders together in a public dialogue, which can be a model for others.

  • Diane Bell

    Chronicling life in and around the region.

  • Lisa Deaderick

    Conversations about social justice issues with activists, experts and everyday people.

  • Karla Peterson

    Stories on San Diego’s community and cultural life from an award-winning columnist.

  • Michael Smolens

    Political analysis from a veteran San Diego journalist.

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An in-depth look at Week 8’s NFL matchups and how they’ll affect your fantasy football lineup

A.J. Preller’s program took a big jump in 2020, but new challenges are bound to emerge

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VIDEO | 31:37
ImmunityBio CEO Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong discusses the company’s upcoming COVID-19 vaccine trial
Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong

The Food and Drug Administration has cleared ImmunityBio to begin testing an experimental COVID-19 vaccine in clinical trials, according to an announcement issued Thursday by the Southern California biotech.

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VIDEO | 09:40
Returned: What happens when the asylum system doesn’t protect someone in danger
Nilsa Rosibel Estrada Villanueva, 24, visits the site where her brother, Yovin Estrada Villanueva, is buried to install his grave stone engraving.

“Returned” is a multi-part series launched by the Union-Tribune this year that investigates the U.S. asylum system.

Brawley doctor details the grueling path back to life after 52 days spent on life-saving machine.

Legal representatives for asylum seekers who have been forced to wait in Mexico for U.S. hearings are suing the federal government over the Trump administration’s Migrant Protection Protocols

The deadly shooting occurred around 5:45 p.m. in San Ysidro, in an area south of the Las Americas Premium Outlets and west of the pedestrian crossing into Mexico

RETURNED: PART III

What’s at stake when asylum is denied? After deportation, many Central Americans are killed by the people they fled.

For Central American migrants fleeing gang violence, winning protection in the United States can be particularly difficult

Immigration reporter Kate Morrissey shares experiences from her trip to San Pedro Sula for the third installment in a series on the U.S. asylum system

“Returned” is a multi-part series launched by the Union-Tribune this year that investigates the U.S. asylum system.

Photos: Citizen scientists help keep tabs on county’s plants and animals.

The busiest local participant is B.J. Stacey, 50, who lives in Santee. He’s uploaded almost 88,000 observations, more than anybody else in San Diego and California, third-most in the United States, and fifth-most in the world.

Photos: SDSU Aztecs vs. UNLV Rebels

SDSU Aztecs vs. UNLV Rebels

Photos: Marches in San Diego, across nation ask women to vote for change.

About 300 people marched in Balboa Park Saturday in solidarity with demonstrations in Washington, other cities.

Photos: Karla Ruiz MacFarland becomes the first female mayor of the border city

Karla Ruiz MacFarland, the current secretary of municipal education, steps in to fill the last year of Arturo González Cruz’s two-year mayoral term.

Blue Star Learning used fake students and graduates to fraudulently obtain millions in G.I. Bill funding over three years

Sgt. Tristan King’s social media photos have been stolen and used by others to open fraudulent accounts using his name

The report found increases in spending and jobs in the defense sector has helped stabilize the local economy

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Study Shows Employees Offered Financial Incentives Were 33 Times More Likely to Participate in Wellness Programs

BOSTON, Nov. 7, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- New research shows that when employers offered financial incentives, employees were 33 times more likely to participate in telephone health coaching, and did so sooner, than employees without incentives. Telephone health coaching – one-on-one phone calls with a personal health coach – is one of myriad employee wellness programs that employers and insurers can offer today. With all that goes on in the workplace, employee wellness programs can sometimes go unnoticed; however this new research shows that adding an incentive can drastically change participation numbers, thus leading to a potential increase in overall health and a decrease in costs for health plans. The findings will be presented during an oral presentation on Friday, Nov. 7 at The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekSM 2014 in Boston, Mass.

"While the jury is still out about whether workplace wellness programs improve health, the programs have great potential," said lead author Jason Block, MD, TOS Member and Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School's Department of Population Medicine. "Our goal was to evaluate what motivates people to participate in these programs and what strategies companies and insurers can use to get everyone involved. Our data show that financial incentives clearly work to motivate participation in a health coach program."

From October 2010 to July 2013, researchers led by Dr. Block gathered data on adult members of one non-profit health plan.  They compared the uptake of a telephone health coaching program among the 16,961 members who received financial incentives to the 974,782 members who did not. Their research found that during the nearly 3 year follow-up period, 10% of the members with incentives began using the telephone health coaching, whereas only 0.3% of those without the incentives did so. Financial incentives were also strongly associated with how long it took members to begin using the program. Members who used the telephone health coaching typically had 6 - 7 interactions with a coach over an average duration of four months, where they discussed their lifestyle, assessed their health situation and concerns, and worked to develop specific health goals.

"The idea of using employer incentives to participate in health coaching is relatively new," says Eric Finkelstein, PhD, MHA, an Associate Research Professor in the Duke Global Health Institute at Duke University speaking on behalf of TOS. "This research gives us a solid foundation to build upon. The next step is to measure changes in these participants' health behaviors, and identify long-term success."

TOS agrees the workplace is one of the best places to encourage health habits and pledges support each June for National Employee Wellness Month.   

TOS also offers advice for companies looking to implement their own programs and encourages them to focus on incentives for participation, rather than penalties. In a TOS position statement released in 2013, TOS members examined the research in the area and made recommendations for employers when developing these programs, including:

  1. Structure programs to reward employees for engaging in healthy habits;
  2. Avoid the use of BMI as a basis for financial penalties or incentives;
  3. Ensure incentive programs are matched with health plans that cover evidence-based obesity treatment programs and medications;
  4. Focus programs on overall wellness for all employees, rather than only those affected by obesity or overweight, and;
  5. Create a supportive workplace environment that provides opportunities for healthy behaviors, such as healthy food options in the cafeteria and vending machines.

"Tackling obesity in the workplace requires a holistic approach with a focus on supporting employees in their health journey," continues Finkelstein. "Getting it right means workplaces that are encouraging healthy activities, employee cafeterias with healthy options, leaders who model healthy behavior and health plans that cover a wide range of treatments for obesity and overweight."

The full abstract on this study is available online.

About The Obesity Society (TOS) 
TOS is the leading scientific society dedicated to the study of obesity. TOS is committed to encouraging research on the causes, treatment, and prevention of obesity as well as to keeping the scientific community and public informed of new advances in the field. For more information please visit: www.obesity.org. Connect with TOS on social media: Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Find TOS disclosures here

About ObesityWeek 2014
ObesityWeek is the premier, international event focused on the basic science, clinical application, prevention and treatment of obesity. TOS and the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) host the world's pre-eminent conference on obesity, ObesityWeek 2014, Nov. 2-7, at the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center in Boston, Mass. For the second year, both organizations hold their respective annual scientific meetings under one roof to unveil exciting new research, discuss emerging treatment and prevention options, and network and present. Connect and share with ObesityWeek on Twitter and Facebook, or by using #OW2014. 

SOURCE The Obesity Society

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